Olive the cat laying on my journal
My typical morning trying to write three pages in my journal with Olive wanting my attention.

Yesterday we had plans to see the movie “Amsterdam” with our new friends who live around the corner. Yes, they are California transplants, too. It seems our neighborhood got filled with us during COVID.

Our neighbors bought the movie tickets and made reservations for dinner. I was looking forward to the movie because it stars Christian Bale and Margot Robbie. It’s directed by the same guy (David O. Russell) who did “American Hustle” and “Silver Linings Playbook.” Also, we never go out on a weeknight, so this was unusually fun for us.

My husband got a text from our neighbor that his wife got sick and they wouldn’t be able to go. They were going to the doctor instead. So they emailed us the digital tickets. Then my husband had an appointment in Phoenix. I was going to meet him at the movies 30 minutes away. Then he texted me that he wouldn’t be able to get away in time to make it to the movie.

Oh well. Best laid plans. Exactly where did the saying “Best laid plans of mice and men oft go astray” come from?

I looked it up and this is what I found:

best-laid schemes/plans, the

The most careful plans sometimes do not succeed. It was probably already a 
cliché by the time Robert Burns used the phrase in “To a Mouse” (1786): “The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men gang aft a-gley [go often astray].”

The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

What plans have you had go astray lately?

Have you seen “Amsterdam?” Did you like it?

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